• Infant Birth to 18 months
  • Toddler 19 months to 3 years
  • Preschooler 3 to 5 years

Infant : 1 Month

One month old

What an exciting time! You and your baby are discovering each other, and your child is discovering the world. Welcome to the first month of your baby’s life. Some amazing things are set to happen. For example, you’ll notice your baby will begin to:

  • Stare at colourful objects. Study your face when you smile.
  • Respond positively to comfort and soothing.
  • Cry to tell you they are hungry or uncomfortable.
  • Enjoy being talked to and respond with their own special happy dance – on their back, waving their arms and legs.

Your newborn is dependent on you for everything, but has more capacities and abilities than you’d think. The best way to learn about your baby is to spend lots of time with them. You’ll learn about their temperament, about how sensitive they are to touch, sounds and sights, about what upsets them. Each child is unique and requires different care.

Things to Remember...

Long before your child can talk, they are trying to tell you things by sending you cues about what they need, wants and feels. Babies are learning language before they begin to speak. Even when they are only a few months old, your baby will be testing different types of cries, gurgles, facial expressions and so on to see how you and other people around them respond. They’ll learn to repeat the types of cries and movements that produce the results they want. Learning how effective they are at “making things happen” help them to develop self-esteem and a willingness to try new things. When your baby makes sounds, repeat them and add to them.

Developmental Milestones at 1 Month

Social

Social Development  at this stage is all about how your baby develops relationships with you and other adults; imitating behaviours of adults, and maintaining connections. These skills emerge and develop throughout infancy; and are best supported through the nurturing of  caregivers and other adults in an infant’s life.

Typical Skills

  • Fixes eyes on your face in response to your smile
  • Moves body in response to your voice during interaction
  • Quiets down when looking at familiar faces
  • Engages in eye contact

Emerging Skills

  • May smile back at face or voice
  • Listens to voices and coos
  • Recognizes familiar voices

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Emotional

Emotional Development include how your baby establishes a sense of self, how he learns and experience a variety of emotions; and develop self-regulation over time with the support of parents and other familiar adults. These skills are increasingly developing overtime as infants learn more about themselves and are consistently supported through nurturing relationships from you and other caregivers.

Typical Skills

  • Enjoys/needs a great deal of physical contact and tactile stimulation
  • Responds positively to comfort and satisfaction
  • Cries when in pain or discomfort

Emerging Skills

  • Recognizes and calms down to a familiar voice
  • Communicates moods through different cries

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Fine Motor

Fine Motor Development includes the development of various forms of grasps such as palmar and pincer grasp. Palmar grasp is when an infant holds an object with their entire palm; pincer grasp is when an infant holds an object using their forefinger and thumb to lift and hold small objects.

Typical Skills

  • Stares at colourful objects 8 – 14 inches away
  • Follows person with eyes while lying on back
  • Generally keeps hands closed in a fist or slightly open
  • When fingers are pried open (usual position is a fist), grasps handle of spoon or rattle, but drops it quickly

Emerging Skills

  • Holds object for a few moments without any intent or purpose
  • Coordinates eyes better to track moving objects
  • Becomes fascinated by her own hands

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Gross Motor

Gross Motor Development refers to crawling, pulling oneself up to stand, cruising, and walking. These gross motor skills occurs for all infants as they first begin crawls and eventually start walking as they become toddlers.

Typical Skills

  • Lift their head when held against your chest; their head sags, flops forward or backwards when not supported.
  • All arm, leg and hand movements are still and they move with little control;. when lying on back, tonic neck reflex characterized by bobbing head (fencer’s position) still predominates; arms and legs are waving around.
  • When on tummy, turns head to clear nose from bed; lifts head briefly.

Emerging Skills

  • Fit their form to yours when held; grasps, clasps people.
  • Lifts head temporarily when lying on stomach.
  • Holds head in line with back when pulled to sitting position.

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Intellectual

Intellectual Development means exploring cause-and-effect exploration, problem solving, imitation, spatial and memory exploration. Cause-and-effect exploration is repeating actions that produce similar outcomes. Problem solving within infancy is exploring objects with their hands, finger, toes or other body parts, and finding hidden toys, objects or people. Spatial and memory exploration is tracking moving objects and recognizing previously seen objects or faces.

Typical Skills

  • Cries when hungry or uncomfortable
  • May make throaty sounds like ‘ooooh’ or ‘aaaah’
  • Enjoys being talked to and responds to voices/sounds
  • Pays close attention to faces of those closest to them
  • Responds to loud or sudden noises with a sudden start (early signs of a developing response system)
  • Focuses on high contrast patterns and faces; prefers these to bright or big objects

Emerging Skills

  • Turns toward familiar sounds and voices
  • Can distinguish familiar voices, from other non familiar voices
  • Can distinguish everyday speech from non-speech sounds
  • Responds to positive and negative expressions as well as subtle differences in a parent’s voice
  • Co-ordinates eyes and tracks objects, e.g., follows toy from side to center of their body but only if it is in their line of vision

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Language

Language Development refers to various forms of communication: verbal and non-verbal communication skills which an infant develops from the first month of infancy through to 24 months as they become toddlers. Verbal communication is the sounds infants typically make, such as ‘oooooh’ or ‘aaaah’. These sounds continuously develop and eventually become words. Example of non-verbal communication; eye contact with caregivers, gazing with the eyes and various forms of gestures to communicate the infant’s needs.

Typical Skills

  • Cries when hungry or uncomfortable
  • May make throaty sounds like ‘ooooh’ and ‘aaaah’
  • Responds to loud or sudden noises when a sudden start (early signs of a developing response system)

Emerging Skills

  • Turns towards similar sounds and voices
  • Can distinguish from men and women, and mother from other women’s voices

Activities to Support Your Child's Development