• Infant Birth to 18 months
  • Toddler 19 months to 3 years
  • Preschooler 3 to 5 years

Infant : 10 to 12 Months

Ten to twelve month old

The last months of your baby’s first year are a time full of wonderful new accomplishments. Your baby will start to demonstrate more predictable skills:

  • Walk while holding onto furniture.
  • Pinch fingers neatly to pick up the smallest items.
  • Repeat sounds or gestures if laughed at.
  • Display affection with hugs, kisses and pats.
  • Understand simple sentences and requests like ‘Where’s your shoe?’

At about a year old, your baby will be actively learning about what’s around them, with fearlessness and curiosity. They will being to walk alone any time now, and can grasp objects with thumb and forefinger. They will be really focused on you, and will want to keep you in sight as they explore. The more a caregiver is available to a child, providing a relationship they can count on, the more this promotes secure attachment. They learn to function independently, because this builds confidence and security. As they try to become independent, they need to be allowed to feed themselves and help with dressing, such as putting their arms up. They learn by doing things over and over, and will like the same stories and games repeated. You’ll notice that they are also a great imitator of adult behaviour – they like to “perform.”

Things to Remember...

Babies experience relationships through their senses, so lots of talking, cuddling and eye contact are the way to tell your child you love them. It’s not humanly possible to always be there when they want a hug, but do notice when they are “asking” for one and do your best to deliver. You can’t spoil a baby by meeting all their needs.

Developmental Milestones at 10 to 12 Months

Social

Social Development  at this stage is all about how your baby develops relationships with you and other adults; imitating behaviours of adults, and maintaining connections. These skills emerge and develop throughout infancy; and are best supported through the nurturing of  caregivers and other adults in an infant’s life.

Typical Skills

  • Knows when parent approves or disapproves of behaviour
  • Tries to help when being dressed, for example, by putting arms out for sleeves or feet for shoes
  • Loves to shake head and say ‘no’ even when they mean ‘yes’
  • Imitates adult movements and movements and play of other children
  • Repeats sounds or gestures if laughed at
  • Distinguishes self from others

Emerging Skills

  • “Dances” to music
  • Shows familiarity with rituals and routines of the day; knows what comes next
  • Experiments with ways to get attention; enjoys being centre of attention
  • Responds to requests, e.g., generally gives up toys on request

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Emotional

Emotional Development include how your baby establishes a sense of self, how he learns and experience a variety of emotions; and develop self-regulation over time with the support of parents and other familiar adults. These skills are increasingly developing overtime as infants learn more about themselves and are consistently supported through nurturing relationships from you and other caregivers.

Typical Skills

  • Is able to seek comfort when upset, i.e., reaches up to be held
  • Expresses many emotions and recognizes them in others, e.g., sad, happy, mad, scared, hurt, discomfort
  • Feels guilty when they do something wrong
  • Will communicate their need to be in constant sight and hearing of an adult
  • Displays affection in hugs, kisses, pats and smiles

Emerging Skills

  • Negativism increases; refuses to eat meals, new foods; resists napping; may have tantrums
  • Displays independent behaviour; resists adult control
  • Communicates specific preferences for certain people and toys, e.g., crying, laughing
  • Able to communicate discomfort when fearful or stressed; may express new fears and insecurity with situations they were fine with before

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Fine Motor

Fine Motor Development includes the development of various forms of grasps such as palmar and pincer grasp. Palmar grasp is when an infant holds an object with their entire palm; pincer grasp is when an infant holds an object using their forefinger and thumb to lift and hold small objects.

Typical Skills

  • Uses pincer grasp (tips of index finger and thumb) to pick up small items
  • Puts objects in and takes them out of container
  • Points, pokes, touches and pries with extended index finger
  • Places one block on top of another without balancing
  • Voluntarily releases objects to another person on request
  • Holds spoon but needs help with its use

Emerging Skills

  • Uses both hands freely – may show preference for one
  • Pulls off socks, hats
  • Holds crayons, makes marks
  • Builds tower using two cubes
  • Points with index finger
  • Feeds self with spoon and drinks from a cup

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Gross Motor

Gross Motor Development refers to crawling, pulling oneself up to stand, cruising, and walking. These gross motor skills occurs for all infants as they first begin crawls and eventually start walking as they become toddlers.

Typical Skills

  • Turns in a circle when sitting – twists to pick up objects
  • Stands by flexing knees, pushing off from squat
  • Walks while holding on to furniture
  • Walks when you hold both hands
  • Crawls up stairs
  • Crawls on the floor expertly

Emerging Skills

  • Walks with one hand held
  • Squats down, stoops, bends over, then stands up
  • Crawls up and down stairs
  • Walks alone 2 or 3 steps
  • Plops down when moves from standing to sitting position

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Intellectual

Intellectual Development means exploring cause-and-effect exploration, problem solving, imitation, spatial and memory exploration. Cause-and-effect exploration is repeating actions that produce similar outcomes. Problem solving within infancy is exploring objects with their hands, finger, toes or other body parts, and finding hidden toys, objects or people. Spatial and memory exploration is tracking moving objects and recognizing previously seen objects or faces.

Typical Skills

  • Searches for object if he knows it is hidden, e.g., lifts inverted cup, looks in box for toy or unwraps toy
  • Tries out new actions for same goal; modifies old ones through trial and error
  • Associates actions and sounds with things for example, meows for kitten, points up when he sees a bird
  • Is aware of his own actions and some of their implications; compares same action done with both sides of his body
  • Develops stronger memory skills

Emerging Skills

  • Enjoys looking at pictures in books
    Points to correct parts of the body when asked where they are
  • Knows that smaller objects fit in larger ones
  • Searches for hidden object, whether he remembers it was hidden or he hasn’t seen it hidden
  • Able to match shapes, e.g., places a cylindrical object in a matching hole in a container
  • Repeats an action that gets a reaction, such as knocking over blocks

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Language

Language Development refers to various forms of communication: verbal and non-verbal communication skills which an infant develops from the first month of infancy through to 24 months as they become toddlers. Verbal communication is the sounds infants typically make, such as ‘oooooh’ or ‘aaaah’. These sounds continuously develop and eventually become words. Example of non-verbal communication; eye contact with caregivers, gazing with the eyes and various forms of gestures to communicate the infant’s needs.

Typical Skills

  • Understands simple sentences, questions and requests, for example, ‘Give the book to me,’ ‘Find your ball’, ‘Where’s your shoe?’
  • Learns words and appropriate gestures like saying ‘no’ and shaking his head, saying ‘bye-bye’ and waving, also exclamations such as ‘oh-oh!’
  • Starts to anticipate when a surprise happens in a song
    Takes turns making sounds with you

Emerging Skills

  • Responds to simple verbal requests
  • Uses expressive vocabulary, 2-8 words, like ‘no’, ‘baby’, ‘bye-bye’, ‘hi’ and words that imitate sounds of objects, i.e., bow wow
  • Uses a single word to express a whole thought
  • May not talk as much while mastering walking

Activities to Support Your Child's Development