• Infant Birth to 18 months
  • Toddler 19 months to 3 years
  • Preschooler 3 to 5 years

Infant : 13 to 18 Months

Thirteen to eighteen month old

Your baby’s second year of life brings new skills for a different perspective on the world around her. At this stage your baby will start to demonstrate more predictable skills:

  • Push and pull toys while walking.
  • Turn pages of a book. Show a sense of humour.
  • Show a sense of humour.
  • Identify herself in the mirror or photograph.
  • Realize that things are still there, even when they are out of sight.

As your child approaches 18 months, they are feeling more independent, and also as if they are the center of the universe – but not in a bad way. Your child is learning that they are a separate person, which is wonderful and scary all at the same time. Your child may try to learn about your limits by testing you in different situations. As they become more of an individual, they’ll be very curious and “get into things.”

Things to Remember...

Babies are most ready to learn when they are calm and alert, in a quiet environment. This is a good time to spend with them, and to play.

Developmental Milestones at 13 to 18 Months

Social

Social Development  at this stage is all about how your baby develops relationships with you and other adults; imitating behaviours of adults, and maintaining connections. These skills emerge and develop throughout infancy; and are best supported through the nurturing of  caregivers and other adults in an infant’s life.

Typical Skills

  • Begins to show sense of humour
  • Plays best on their own; doesn’t want to share toys, shouting, “Mine, mine” or fights with another child over who gets to use a specific toy
  • Enjoys imitating adult task, example, dusting, sweeping floors, setting the table, raking lawn, etc.
  • Strongly resists limits you set
  • Looks at you when you are talking or playing together

Emerging Skills

  • May be able to cooperate at times but may not respond quickly or will do the opposite of the request
  • Plays alongside and parallel to another child
  • Tries to dress/undress themselves, e.g., pull up pants, undo Velcro shoe fasteners

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Emotional

Emotional Development include how your baby establishes a sense of self, how he learns and experience a variety of emotions; and develop self-regulation over time with the support of parents and other familiar adults. These skills are increasingly developing overtime as infants learn more about themselves and are consistently supported through nurturing relationships from you and other caregivers.

Typical Skills

  • Is more confident, exploring and trying new things, taking risks when a trusted adult is present or has provided reassurance
  • Shows particular interest in a music tape, special picture books or fish in a tank
  • Identifies self in mirror or photograph; becomes more of an individual
  • Hugs and kisses parents and other very familiar people and pets
  • Enjoys being the center of attention

Emerging Skills

  • Shows jealousy when attention is given to other family members
  • Shows frustration easily
  • Displays a sense of ownership over toys and people

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Fine Motor

Fine Motor Development includes the development of various forms of grasps such as palmar and pincer grasp. Palmar grasp is when an infant holds an object with their entire palm; pincer grasp is when an infant holds an object using their forefinger and thumb to lift and hold small objects.

Typical Skills

  • Releases object to other person on request or gesture
  • Picks up and eats finger foods, e.g., raisin, cheerio, cracker, etc.
  • Turns container upside down to get an item out
  • Puts pegs into a pegboard
  • Turns pages of a book
  • Stacks three or more blocks
  • Scribbles with a big crayon

Emerging Skills

  • Feeds self with spoon and fork
  • Throws ball forward
  • Begins to unlatch, unscrew, open and take apart
  • Squeezes, pokes, and pats playdough
  • Copies simple lines drawn on paper

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Gross Motor

Gross Motor Development refers to crawling, pulling oneself up to stand, cruising, and walking. These gross motor skills occurs for all infants as they first begin crawls and eventually start walking as they become toddlers.

Typical Skills

  • Walks alone
  • Crawls or walks upstairs one step at a time holding onto banister or hand
  • Pushes and pulls toys while walking
  • Squats to pick up toy without falling
  • Climbs on things by himself, for example, chairs, sofas, tables or out of cribs, high chairs, strollers

Emerging Skills

  • Walks down stairs holding rail – both feet on step
  • Tries to kick a ball
  • Likes to ride toys
  • Likes to run, but falls and bumps into things
  • Walks backward

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Intellectual

Intellectual Development means exploring cause-and-effect exploration, problem solving, imitation, spatial and memory exploration. Cause-and-effect exploration is repeating actions that produce similar outcomes. Problem solving within infancy is exploring objects with their hands, finger, toes or other body parts, and finding hidden toys, objects or people. Spatial and memory exploration is tracking moving objects and recognizing previously seen objects or faces.

Typical Skills

  • Realizes things exist when they are out of sight
  • Shows understanding of some colours and shapes, e.g., matches circles and squares on a form board
  • Identifies pictures when requested, e.g., “Show me” or “Where’s the ___?”
  • Gains new understanding of the world around him while exploring the environment by looking for something to fit in holes; mix, fill, pile and dump sand at the sand table; stack, knock over or restack a set of boxes, blocks.
  • Shows increased memory skills, e.g., uses her own plastic screwdriver the same way she saw an adult turn the tool; tries to insert a key into the lock of a door; shows recognition of sounds such as footsteps or water running in the bathtub

Emerging Skills

  • Groups similar things, such as socks, shoes
  • Engages in imaginative play during daily routines such as feeding, putting to bed or bathing dolls
  • Uses playdough and paints

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Language

Language Development refers to various forms of communication: verbal and non-verbal communication skills which an infant develops from the first month of infancy through to 24 months as they become toddlers. Verbal communication is the sounds infants typically make, such as ‘oooooh’ or ‘aaaah’. These sounds continuously develop and eventually become words. Example of non-verbal communication; eye contact with caregivers, gazing with the eyes and various forms of gestures to communicate the infant’s needs.

Typical Skills

  • Points to show you something
  • Understands far more words than can speak, e.g., can point to at least 3 different body parts when asked, “Where’s your mouth?”
  • Uses “no” correctly, often with a shake of the head
  • Uses 5 or more words to express needs, desires or expressions such as “all gone”
  • Tries to sing songs

Emerging Skills

  • Names pictures in a book, imitates animal sounds
  • Uses own name to refer to self
  • Follows simple directions without gestures, e.g., “Come, show me, go get, etc.”

Activities to Support Your Child's Development