• Infant Birth to 18 months
  • Toddler 19 months to 3 years
  • Preschooler 3 to 5 years

Toddler : 19 to 24 Months

Nineteen to twenty-four month old

Your toddler is entering a new and exciting stage of life. In this first stage, they will start to:

  • Kick a ball
  • Take off shoes, socks and hats
  • Show ownership or possession of objects.
  • Show fear, but is able to be settled down
  • Use two word sentences such as ‘More juice’

In the toddler stage, you face the challenge of living with a child who is trying to be independent but is still a bit scared of it all. As a result, there are sudden shifts in emotions, and tantrums. “No” seems to be your child’s favourite answer. They want help, but they don’t want it. They can be clinging and afraid you’ll abandon them, but the next minute may want nothing to do with you. You need lots of patience, and your child needs lots of praise and encouragement as they try to do things for themselves. And toddlers learn by doing. There’s no “good” or “bad” about it – they just want to try new things, so make sure your child is supervised.

Things to Remember...

It’s time to start setting some limits beyond safety when your child is a toddler. You and your child’s primary caregivers should agree on what they are, so you can be consistent. They should make sense and really matter. A few rules like “no hurting others”, “be gentle”, should be set. If you have too many limits, or they become too trivial, everyone will get frustrated. Let your child know what the expectations and limits are, and stick to them. Be firm – and consistent. And it’s a good idea to remind your child of the expectations and limits before beginning a new activity or going out somewhere.

Developmental Milestones at 19 to 24 Months

Social

Social Development as a toddler includes the observation of other children playing. Toddlers often play alone or at the same activity with other children for a short period of time, but will typically not engage with the other children.

Typical Skills

  • Enjoys playing alone for a few minutes, e.g., building blocks, drawing, looking at books
  • Shows ownership or possession of objects and cannot share easily
  • Says ‘no’ and likes to do things without help
  • Helps with simple household chores

Emerging Skills

  • Distinguish themselves as a separate person, contrasts themselves with others
  • Begins to be toilet trained
  • Puts on simple clothing without help

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Emotional

Emotional Development as a toddler, includes expression of feelings, regulations of emotions, beginning to develop empathy for others, and becoming more familiar with a sense of self and identity formation. Toddlers expressions of feelings may include emotions such as anger, happiness, and sadness. Self-regulation refers to emotional, behavioural and attention regulation as children develop and regulate their emotions, actions and focus. Toddlers begin to develop a sense of empathy as they become more aware of their feelings and the feelings of others. Identity formation and sense of self is when a child becomes increasingly aware of themselves recognizing himself in mirror and pointing to own body parts.

Typical Skills

  • Beginning to develop a range of emotions; is subject to mood swings and tantrums; shows some aggressive tendencies, e.g., biting and hitting
  • Shows concern for others
  • Shows fears, but can be settled down
  • Is pulled between the need to show independence and still being dependent for certain things
  • Still cautious around unfamiliar adults i.e. allows self to be drawn into play with a new adult as long as a familiar person is nearby

Emerging Skills

  • Uses words such as “no” a lot
  • Shares a piece of food
  • Familiar with routines and the order of the day; is unhappy about any changes in routine and likes to do things the same way each day
  • Develops a sense of comfort or fear with different experiences and objects, e.g., fear of the dark

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Fine Motor

Fine Motor Development for toddlers involves a continuous progress of various forms of grasps. Palmar grasp is when an infant hold an object with their entire palm. Pincer grasp is when an infant holds an object using their forefinger and thumb to lift and hold small objects. Toddlers beginning to dress themselves, pull up zippers. During this stage they begin to feed themselves using cups and utensils independently.

Typical Skills

  • Takes lids off jars
  • Fits cups and boxes inside each other (nesting)
  • Takes off shoes, hat and socks
  • Strings large beads, using one hand to slide the bead while the other hand holds the string
  • Raises and drinks from a cup then replaces it on table

Emerging Skills

  • Opens doors by turning knobs
  • Imitates horizontal or circular strokes with a crayon
  • Snips with child-sized scissors
  • Folds paper in half

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Gross Motor

Gross Motor Development refers to balancing, jumping, walking and running, climbing and using riding toys, pushing with feet to move forward and backward.

Typical Skills

  • Rides on small wheeled toys
  • Carries a large toy while walking
  • Kicks a ball
  • Squats while playing
  • Walks backwards or sideways pulling a toy
  • Backs into chair to sit down

Emerging Skills

  • Walks on tip-toes
  • Throws and retrieves objects
  • Jumps in place with both feet
  • Catches a large ball

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Intellectual

Language Development refers to various forms of language such as receptive and expressive language skills. Receptive language refers to toddlers listening to stories and responding to commands. For example completing the actions of ‘head and shoulders, knees and toes’. Expressive language combines words to communicate, increasing vocabulary and attempting to join conversations.

Typical Skills

  • Understands how familiar objects are used, e.g., spoon for eating, cup for drinking, ball for throwing, hammer for banging, etc.
  • Understands the passing of time and the meaning of “not now” and “when we go home”
  • Recognizes and names familiar people in photos
  • Busy mastering existing skills which leads to the emergence of new ones
  • Shows increased memory for details and routines, e.g., says “hot” when reaching for a coffee cup; holds up seat belt in car seat to indicate it needs to be secured; remembers where objects go

Emerging Skills

  • Explores one-to-one correspondence
  • Has a sense of more than one
  • Has intense curiosity to investigate any new person, object or sound
  • Understands two-part requests, e.g., “Go to the shelf and bring over the blocks”

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Language

Language Development refers to various forms of language such as receptive and expressive language skills. Receptive language refers to toddlers listening to stories and responding to commands. For example completing the actions of ‘head and shoulders, knees and toes’. Expressive language is using combining words to communicate, increasing vocabulary and attempting to join conversations.

Typical Skills

  • Uses two word sentences, e.g., “more juice” or “want cookie”
  • Asks for help using words or actions
  • Jabbers in run-on flow of words while talking to stuffed animals or self
  • Names some pictures in a book
  • Imitates new words and phrases, e.g., “Go bye-bye” and “Mommy’s car”

Emerging Skills

  • Sings simple songs with correct words and actions
  • Is more articulate; many more words are understood by others outside the family
  • Starts to use plurals
  • Uses past tense
  • Imitates spontaneously or requests new words