• Infant Birth to 18 months
  • Toddler 19 months to 3 years
  • Preschooler 3 to 5 years

Infant : 2 Months

2 month old

As your baby enters the second month, they will gain new skills right before your eyes. At this stage you will notice that your baby is beginning to:

  • Turn their head to both sides.
  • Follow objects and people with their eyes.
  • Smile when others talk to them and smile at them.
  • Show excitement or delight with small throaty sounds.
  • Recognize familiar voices and people.

Newborns go through a cycle of sleeping, eating, crying and being alert. Many sleep 18 out of 24 hours, but it’s often in short periods, and usually during the day more than the night. You’ll have to help them learn the difference between night and day, such as by darkening the room and keeping things quiet at night. During the first few weeks, many parents feed “on demand” (whenever the baby seems hungry), but by about three months you can begin to establish a routine.

Things to Remember...

You can’t spoil a baby by responding to all their needs. Babies are born with a need for human contact. And in the process, you’re learning more about them, and they are learning more about you – in particular, that they can count on you.

Developmental Milestones at 2 Months

Social

Social Development  at this stage is all about how your baby develops relationships with you and other adults; imitating behaviours of adults, and maintaining connections. These skills emerge and develop throughout infancy; and are best supported through the nurturing of  caregivers and other adults in an infant’s life.

Typical Skills

  • Fixes eyes on your face in response to your smile
  • Studies faces alertly and is more oriented to their surroundings

Emerging Skills

  • Becomes more expressive with their face, body, muscle tone and voice
  • Listens to voices and coos
  • Knows difference between family members and strangers

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Emotional

Emotional Development include how your baby establishes a sense of self, how he learns and experience a variety of emotions; and develop self-regulation over time with the support of parents and other familiar adults. These skills are increasingly developing overtime as infants learn more about themselves and are consistently supported through nurturing relationships from you and other caregivers.

Typical Skills

  • Shows different moods such as distress with different cries and excitement and delight with small throaty sounds
  • Can quiet themselves by sucking their fingers, a pacifier, etc.
  • Expresses contentment when touched and cuddled
  • Able to express discontent, e.g., fusses at loud noises
  • Displays different emotions as seen with peaks of irritability and crying

Emerging Skills

  • Fits their form to yours and relaxes body when held
  • Makes appropriate facial expressions in response to emotions, for example, fear, joy, anger

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Fine Motor

Fine Motor Development includes the development of various forms of grasps such as palmar and pincer grasp. Palmar grasp is when an infant holds an object with their entire palm; pincer grasp is when an infant holds an object using their forefinger and thumb to lift and hold small objects.

Typical Skills

  • Keeps hands closed in a tight fist most of the time
  • Follows objects with eyes, for example, a mobile is a source of pleasure
  • Fascinated by own hands; watches them and turns them over momentarily
  • Holds objects briefly

Emerging Skills

  • Attempts to grasp at things becomes more voluntary
  • May swipe at objects

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Gross Motor

Gross Motor Development refers to crawling, pulling oneself up to stand, cruising, and walking. These gross motor skills occurs for all infants as they first begin crawls and eventually start walking as they become toddlers.

Typical Skills

  • Movements are more deliberate, for example, turns head to both sides when lying down
  • Moves arms and legs and ‘bicycles’ with legs when excited
  • Lifts head temporarily when lying on stomach
  • When sitting, keeps head erect; head may bob as they try this out
  • Rolls from side to back
  • Muscle reflex is developing, e.g., body startles involuntarily

Emerging Skills

  • Can hold head up at 45 degree angle for a few minutes
  • Arms and legs cycle more smoothly
  • Arms move more symmetrically to reach for a toy

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Intellectual

Intellectual Development means exploring cause-and-effect exploration, problem solving, imitation, spatial and memory exploration. Cause-and-effect exploration is repeating actions that produce similar outcomes. Problem solving within infancy is exploring objects with their hands, finger, toes or other body parts, and finding hidden toys, objects or people. Spatial and memory exploration is tracking moving objects and recognizing previously seen objects or faces.

Typical Skills

  • Gurgles, coos and squeals
  • Shows responsiveness to touch and to oral and visual stimulation
  • Stares at surroundings or attractive large, moving objects from several feet; moving or contoured objects hold their attention longer
  • Clearly discriminates voices, people, tastes, proximity and object size
  • Recognizes a few objects, for example, a bottle or rattle

Emerging Skills

  • Repeats actions for their own sake
  • Holds onto objects briefly as their voluntary grasp replaces reflex grasp
  • Begins to look at their hands as objects for examination
  • Starts to associate people with behaviour, for example, mother and feeding
  • Begins to sense that hands and feet are extensions of themselves with limits and opportunities

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Language

Language Development refers to various forms of communication: verbal and non-verbal communication skills which an infant develops from the first month of infancy through to 24 months as they become toddlers. Verbal communication is the sounds infants typically make, such as ‘oooooh’ or ‘aaaah’. These sounds continuously develop and eventually become words. Example of non-verbal communication; eye contact with caregivers, gazing with the eyes and various forms of gestures to communicate the infant’s needs.

Typical Skills

  • Gurgles, coos and squeals
  • Clearly identifies different voices

Emerging Skills

  • Becomes more expressive with their tones and voice
  • Listens to voices and tones

Activities to Support Your Child's Development