• Infant Birth to 18 months
  • Toddler 19 months to 3 years
  • Preschooler 3 to 5 years

Toddler : 25 to 30 Months

Twenty-five to thirty month old

As your child starts into the third year, you will notice some dramatic achievements. For example, your toddler will start to:

  • Walk upstairs and downstairs alone, with both feet on one step.
  • Scribble, clutching the crayon in their whole hand.
  • Show they can be attached to a cuddly or favourite toy.
  • Express feelings through language and pretend play.
  • Better understand the similarities and differences of shapes and sizes.

Your child is using approximately 50 different words and can name most everyday objects. They can use two-word sentences, like “more milk” or “pretty bird.” An adult should be able to understand your child’s talking about half the time by now.

Things to Remember...

Children respond much better to limits when they feel loved and noticed as part of a warm, caring relationship. Try giving directions in a positive way, such as “Please close the door quietly” instead of “Don’t slam the door”. Notice and praise good behaviour. This can build your child’s self-esteem and reduce her need to battle with you all the time.

Developmental Milestones at 25 to 30 Months

Social

Social Development as a toddler includes the observation of other children playing. Toddlers often play alone or at the same activity with other children for a short period of time, but will typically not engage with the other children.

Typical Skills

  • Establishes self as separate from parents, saying, “No! Me do it!”
  • Displays shyness around strangers and in outside situations
  • Likes to play near other children but not yet able to play co-operatively
  • May pull hair, hit or bite other children when frustrated
  • Becomes aware of gender differences

Emerging Skills

  • Helps put things away
  • Approaches new person after you have talked to them
  • Begins to show more readiness for co-operative play
  • Is more able to wait patiently for needs to be met by others
  • Knows own gender, and that of others

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Emotional

Emotional Development as a toddler, includes expression of feelings, regulations of emotions, beginning to develop empathy for others, and becoming more familiar with a sense of self and identity formation. Toddlers expressions of feelings may include emotions such as anger, happiness, and sadness. Self-regulation refers to emotional, behavioural and attention regulation as children develop and regulate their emotions, actions and focus. Toddlers begin to develop a sense of empathy as they become more aware of their feelings and the feelings of others. Identity formation and sense of self is when a child becomes increasingly aware of themselves recognizing himself in mirror and pointing to own body parts.

Typical Skills

  • Moves back and forth between wanting independence and needing security of parents
  • Can still be attached to a cuddly or favourite toy
  • Demands their own way much of the time
  • Needs an ordered, predictable routine (e.g., when saying good-bye to parent in the morning)
  • Expresses feelings through language and pretend play (e.g., roaring like an angry lion)

Emerging Skills

  • Separates more easily from parents
  • Responds to other children’s feelings and begins to show empathy
  • May develop sudden fears
  • Displays frustration and tantrums if they are not understood
  • Becomes less upset by limits and discipline

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Fine Motor

Fine Motor Development for toddlers involves a continuous progress of various forms of grasps. Palmar grasp is when an infant hold an object with their entire palm. Pincer grasp is when an infant holds an object using their forefinger and thumb to lift and hold small objects. Toddlers beginning to dress themselves, pull up zippers. During this stage they begin to feed themselves using cups and utensils independently.

Typical Skills

  • Scribbles, holding the crayon in whole hand
  • Imitates drawing vertical and horizontal lines
  • Builds a tower of 5 or more blocks
  • Strings beads, picking them up with thumb and forefinger
  • Removes lids from jars, rotating wrist

Emerging Skills

  • Begins to use thumb and fingertips when holding crayon
  • Imitates drawing a cross, copies a circle
  • Folds paper
  • Uses small scissors to snip paper
  • Removes clothing already unbuttoned; pulls up zipper

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Gross Motor

Gross Motor Development refers to balancing, jumping, walking and running, climbing and using riding toys, pushing with feet to move forward and backward.

Typical Skills

  • Walks backward and sideways
  • Walks upstairs and downstairs alone, both feet on one step
  • Runs without falling
  • Jumps in place, both feet off the floor
  • Climbs on a riding toy and makes it go using both feet at the same time

Emerging Skills

  • Walks on narrow balance beam
  • Walks upstairs and downstairs, alternating feet, holding the handrail
  • Runs, avoiding obstacles
  • Jumps forward
  • Pedals a tricycle

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Intellectual

Intellectual Development as a toddler the exploration of  cause-and-effect, problem solving, imitation, spatial and memory exploration. Cause-and-effect exploration is repeating actions that produce similar outcomes. Problem solving is solving problems in action of trial and error, and seeking out an adult to help meet goals. Spatial and memory exploration is putting things together and taking them apart, and establishing routines.

Typical Skills

  • Engages in simple pretend play with others
  • Matches shapes, pictures, some colours
  • Can better understand the similarities and differences of shapes and sizes
  • Becomes aware of verbal sequence of numbers
  • Shows increased attention span, staying with activities longer

Emerging Skills

  • Sorts groups of objects into sets
  • Completes simple puzzles
  • Combines toys and games in more complex ways (e.g., uses playdough in dramatic play)
  • Begins to understand the concept of future time, e.g., ‘soon’, ‘in a long time’, but not past, e.g., ‘yesterday’
  • Begins to understand one-to-one actions, e.g., one plate per person

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Language

Language Development refers to various forms of language such as receptive and expressive language skills. Receptive language refers to toddlers listening to stories and responding to commands. For example completing the actions of ‘head and shoulders, knees and toes’. Expressive language combines words to communicate, increasing vocabulary and attempting to join conversations.

Typical Skills

  • Uses “self-centred” pronouns like ‘I’, ‘me’, ‘mine’, ‘you’
  • Puts together simple, two-word sentences
  • Answers simple questions like, “What’s your name?”, and performs simple tasks when asked to
  • Enjoys looking at books and talking about the pictures
  • Sings parts of songs

Emerging Skills

  • Is able to use words that describe things, e.g., big, dirty, wet, hot
  • Participates more in conversations and stories
  • Is able to provide more information about self (e.g., name, gender, age) and understands two-step directions
  • Can recite a few simple nursery rhymes
  • Uses plurals in a general way (e.g., foots not feet)