• Infant Birth to 18 months
  • Toddler 19 months to 3 years
  • Preschooler 3 to 5 years

Infant : 3 Months

Three month old

Your baby will start to demonstrate more predictable skills. They will start to:

  • Hold their head up with more control.
  • Play with their hands by clasping them and bringing them to their mouth.
  • Stop sucking so that they can hear sounds.
  • Use their voice in response to adult talk and smiles.
  • Coo with open (‘aaaah’) and closed (‘eee’) vowel sounds.

By three months, your baby should be a little more predictable for eating and sleeping times. They’ll also have longer periods of being alert, and will be more interested in what’s around them. They’ll be good at eye contact with you and will smile at people more.

Things to Remember...

Learning to “read” your baby is often fun and can seem easy. You smile, they smile. They reach out, you take their hand. But it can also be hard. For example, if they turn their head away when you speak, it feels awful, like rejection. But they are just telling you they are overtired or overstimulated. Or perhaps because they are very sensitive to noise, they may be telling you they need your voice to be softer – or just to leave them alone for the moment. It will take some trial and error to figure out what your baby is trying to tell you, so don’t be discouraged.

Developmental Milestones at 3 Months

Social

Social Development  at this stage is all about how your baby develops relationships with you and other adults; imitating behaviours of adults, and maintaining connections. These skills emerge and develop throughout infancy; and are best supported through the nurturing of  caregivers and other adults in an infant’s life.

Typical Skills

  • Smiles immediately and spontaneously
  • Responds in excitement with total body and vocalizes to familiar people or things
  • Enjoys socializing and playing with other people; watches speaker’s eyes and mouth
  • Stops sucking to hear sounds around them; then looks around and sucks at the same time
  • Turns head to follow moving objects, voices, or music
  • Vocalizes in response to adult talk and smiles

Emerging Skills

  • Knows difference between family members and strangers
  • Cries less often as they find other ways to communicate and as parents’ ability to understand their needs improve

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Emotional

Emotional Development include how your baby establishes a sense of self, how he learns and experience a variety of emotions; and develop self-regulation over time with the support of parents and other familiar adults. These skills are increasingly developing overtime as infants learn more about themselves and are consistently supported through nurturing relationships from you and other caregivers.

Typical Skills

  • Shows appropriate facial expressions in response to such emotions as anger, fear, joy
  • Reflects feelings of happiness with chortles or squeals; frustration with whimpers; and hunger with smacking lips
  • Begins to show sadness
  • Responds to familiar people; may stop or start crying according to who holds them.
  • Can distinguish and express discomfort

Emerging Skills

  • Starts to laugh
  • Starts to show anger when they cannot get what they desire

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Fine Motor

Fine Motor Development includes the development of various forms of grasps such as palmar and pincer grasp. Palmar grasp is when an infant holds an object with their entire palm; pincer grasp is when an infant holds an object using their forefinger and thumb to lift and hold small objects.

Typical Skills

  • Plays with hands by bringing them together and clasping them
  • Hands/fingers stay open more as grasp reflex fades
  • Bring hands to mouth
  • Reaches for objects with both arms, starting at sides and closing in front of body; often contacts object with closed fists

Emerging Skills

  • Begins to swipe for dangling objects, but may be far off target.
  • Looks from one object to another
  • Watches and touches fingers of both hands as they move toward midline and meet; early stages of eye-hand coordination

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Gross Motor

Gross Motor Development refers to crawling, pulling oneself up to stand, cruising, and walking. These gross motor skills occurs for all infants as they first begin crawls and eventually start walking as they become toddlers.

Typical Skills

  • Keeps head in mid-position while on their back, and move their arm and leg on one side in unison, then the arm and leg of the other side
  • Raises head and chest when on tummy
  • Holds head up with more control
  • Sits with support on a lap

Emerging Skills

  • Swipes with arms
  • Tonic neck reflex (characterized by bobbing head) begins to disappear
  • When pulled to stand, presses feet against surface and stands briefly with support
  • Lifts head and supports chest on extended forearms
  • Splashes and kicks with hands and feet when in the bathtub

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Intellectual

Intellectual Development means exploring cause-and-effect exploration, problem solving, imitation, spatial and memory exploration. Cause-and-effect exploration is repeating actions that produce similar outcomes. Problem solving within infancy is exploring objects with their hands, finger, toes or other body parts, and finding hidden toys, objects or people. Spatial and memory exploration is tracking moving objects and recognizing previously seen objects or faces.

Typical Skills

  • Distinguishes speech from sounds you make
  • Focuses on high contrast patterns and faces
  • Recognizes a few objects (e.g., bottle or rattle)
  • Holds onto objects briefly as their voluntary grasp replaces reflex grasp
  • Look at their hands and feet as objects for examination
  • Begins to sense that hands and feet are extensions of themselves with limits and opportunities
  • Associates people with behaviour, for example, mother and feeding

Emerging Skills

  • Turns toward familiar sounds and voices
  • Expresses different cries for different needs
  • Responds to positive and negative expressions as well as subtle differences in a parent’s voice
  • Holds on to an object voluntarily

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Language

Language Development refers to various forms of communication: verbal and non-verbal communication skills which an infant develops from the first month of infancy through to 24 months as they become toddlers. Verbal communication is the sounds infants typically make, such as ‘oooooh’ or ‘aaaah’. These sounds continuously develop and eventually become words. Example of non-verbal communication; eye contact with caregivers, gazing with the eyes and various forms of gestures to communicate the infant’s needs.

Typical Skills

  • Distinguishes speech from sounds you make
  • Checking in with caregiver using eye contact
  • Looks at what an adult is looking at

Emerging Skills

  • Turn to familiar sounds and voices
  • Expresses different cries for different needs

Activities to Support Your Child's Development