• Infant Birth to 18 months
  • Toddler 19 months to 3 years
  • Preschooler 3 to 5 years

Infant : 5 Months

Five month old

The fifth month of life sets the stage for more interactive developmental growth. You will notice your baby starting to:

  • Sit, if supported, to view their world.
  • Start to connect eyes and fingers. Cooperate in reaching and grasping toys.
  • Make sounds and interrupt conversations when they want attention.
  • Display an awareness and wariness with strangers.
  • Babble double consonants such as baba, dada, mama.

By five or six months, you’ll probably notice that your baby is happier being with you and other people they know well instead of with strangers. Making your baby feel protected and comforted will promote a secure attachment. They’ll try to get your attention more, and will like being close to you, having you read stories and so on. They’ll also enjoy two-way games, like peek-a-boo. Seeing themsevles in a mirror and seeing other babies will also be popular.

Things to Remember...

Quality time depends on quantity of time. All the occasions when you’re able to spend a few minutes with your child won’t necessarily be happy, special times – when you seem to be close and communicating with each other. You have to spend lots of time getting used to each other and bonding for those special moments to occur. And when you really focus on your child, even during routine, everyday things, those moments will happen more and more.

Developmental Milestones at 5 Months

Social

Social Development  at this stage is all about how your baby develops relationships with you and other adults; imitating behaviours of adults, and maintaining connections. These skills emerge and develop throughout infancy; and are best supported through the nurturing of  caregivers and other adults in an infant’s life.

Typical Skills

  • Makes sounds and interrupts conversations when they want attention
  • Smiles and vocalizes to their mirror image
  • Distinguishes familiar and unfamiliar adults
  • Shows anticipation, waves and raises arms to be picked up
  • Frolics happily when played with; plays with rattle, pats bottle or breast

Emerging Skills

  • Observes adult’s facial expressions intently
  • Bangs playfully on mirror image
  • Learns how to tease

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Emotional

Emotional Development include how your baby establishes a sense of self, how he learns and experience a variety of emotions; and develop self-regulation over time with the support of parents and other familiar adults. These skills are increasingly developing overtime as infants learn more about themselves and are consistently supported through nurturing relationships from you and other caregivers.

Typical Skills

  • Displays awareness and wariness of strangers
  • Expresses anger when they can’t get desired effect
  • Clings to parent when held
  • Shows fear, anger and disgust
  • Pushes away when they don’t like what you’re doing to them, for example, wiping his nose

Emerging Skills

  • Smiles, laughs, squeals when happy; grunts when angry
  • Is content to play by themselves for a while with a few toys either in the crib or playpen
  • Shows strong dislikes and likes about food

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Fine Motor

Fine Motor Development includes the development of various forms of grasps such as palmar and pincer grasp. Palmar grasp is when an infant holds an object with their entire palm; pincer grasp is when an infant holds an object using their forefinger and thumb to lift and hold small objects.

Typical Skills

  • Eyes and fingers co-operate in grasping and manipulating and can reach the target with good aim
  • Drops and picks up objects
  • Grasps object with partial thumb and forefinger
  • Holds bottle with one or two hands
  • Grabs or waves object with either hand

Emerging Skills

  • Transfers objects from hand to hand
  • Bangs objects on table
  • Grasps and holds two objects at once

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Gross Motor

Gross Motor Development refers to crawling, pulling oneself up to stand, cruising, and walking. These gross motor skills occurs for all infants as they first begin crawls and eventually start walking as they become toddlers.

Typical Skills

  • Brings feet to mouth and sucks on toes
  • Moves by either rocking, rolling or pivoting around in a circle on his stomach
  • Sits supported for long periods (30 minutes) with a firm back
  • When held in standing position, stamps feet and jumps up and down, bearing almost all weight on legs shoulders
  • Rolls from stomach to back; on tummy, pushes on hands and draws up knees

Emerging Skills

  • Rolls over from back to stomach
  • Starts to learn to sit unsupported leaning on arms in front of them

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Intellectual

Intellectual Development means exploring cause-and-effect exploration, problem solving, imitation, spatial and memory exploration. Cause-and-effect exploration is repeating actions that produce similar outcomes. Problem solving within infancy is exploring objects with their hands, finger, toes or other body parts, and finding hidden toys, objects or people. Spatial and memory exploration is tracking moving objects and recognizing previously seen objects or faces.

Typical Skills

  • Experiments with the concept of cause and effect, e.g., Cries more deliberately; waits to see if anyone is coming and then cries again
  • Turns head deliberately to sound or to follow vanishing object, e.g., leans over to look for something if dropped
  • Wants to touch, hold, turn, shake and taste everything
  • Remembers their own actions in the immediate past
  • Tries to maintain interesting changes they can make in their environment through repetitive actions

Emerging Skills

  • Responds to their own name
  • Reaches for a second object with purpose
  • Works toward a desired, but out of reach, object

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Language

Language Development refers to various forms of communication: verbal and non-verbal communication skills which an infant develops from the first month of infancy through to 24 months as they become toddlers. Verbal communication is the sounds infants typically make, such as ‘oooooh’ or ‘aaaah’. These sounds continuously develop and eventually become words. Example of non-verbal communication; eye contact with caregivers, gazing with the eyes and various forms of gestures to communicate the infant’s needs.

Typical Skills

  • Watches your mouth, listens to your voice, then experiments with their own sounds
  • Tries to imitate sing-song quality of voice (inflections)
  • Babbles double consonants (baba, dada, mama)
  • Makes “raspberry” sound – tongue out and blowing

Emerging Skills

  • Responds to their own name
  • Distinguishes familiar voices from other sounds

Activities to Support Your Child's Development