• Infant Birth to 18 months
  • Toddler 19 months to 3 years
  • Preschooler 3 to 5 years

Infant : 6 Months

Six month old

Approaching the half-year mark, your baby is becoming an active member of the family. At this stage, your baby will start to demonstrate more predictable skills:

  • Roll from stomach to back and over again.
  • Use hands to bang and splash objects.
  • Prefer to play with people, especially games like ‘peek-a-boo’.
  • Vocalize both pleasure and displeasure.
  • Study objects for a long time, even turning them upside down to get another view.

You’ll notice they show more emotions and moods, and they can change very quickly. They can express sadness, anger, happiness and excitement. They can also begin to quiet down on his own – an infant can self-soothe by sucking, but still need their parents to comfort them when overwhelmed. They will be able to play freely on their own with various toys and materials and still know their caregiver or adults are nearby for support and comfort if needed.

Things to Remember...

Toys don’t replace your personal attention. Giving a child toys and other safe things to play with is an important part of providing a stimulating environment, but playing WITH your child is also essential to your child’s well-being.

Developmental Milestones at 6 Months

Social

Social Development  at this stage is all about how your baby develops relationships with you and other adults; imitating behaviours of adults, and maintaining connections. These skills emerge and develop throughout infancy; and are best supported through the nurturing of  caregivers and other adults in an infant’s life.

Typical Skills

  • Prefers play with people, especially co-operative games – “peek-a-boo”, “come and get me”, “go and find”
  • Tries to imitate some facial expressions
  • Smiles at and enjoys patting mirror image; differentiates self from mirror image
  • Distinguishes adults from children; smiles at and reaches out to pat children who are new to them
  • Demonstrates delightful openness and friendliness

Emerging Skills

  • Is able to copy some facial expressions
  • Starts to cooperate in games with others, e.g., ball games, building blocks, etc.

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Emotional

Emotional Development include how your baby establishes a sense of self, how he learns and experience a variety of emotions; and develop self-regulation over time with the support of parents and other familiar adults. These skills are increasingly developing overtime as infants learn more about themselves and are consistently supported through nurturing relationships from you and other caregivers.

Typical Skills

  • Vocalizes pleasure and displeasure, i.e., squeals with delight and grunts with anger
  • Responds sometimes to the emotional tones of parents’ voices
  • Begins to quiet down on their own after getting upset
  • Displays strong likes/dislikes about food
  • Can be content to play in crib/playpen for a while with one or two toys
  • May communicate discomfort with strangers

Emerging Skills

  • Distinguishes self as separate from parent
  • Demonstrates stranger anxiety or separation anxiety when caregivers leave or are out of site
  • Expresses nervousness or anxiety when separated from parent
  • Shows attachment to special toy or object and uses it to provide comfort in the absence of someone familiar, e.g., may have a special toy that always goes to bed with them

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Fine Motor

Fine Motor Development includes the development of various forms of grasps such as palmar and pincer grasp. Palmar grasp is when an infant holds an object with their entire palm; pincer grasp is when an infant holds an object using their forefinger and thumb to lift and hold small objects.

Typical Skills

  • Reaches for objects with one hand; picks things up with a raking motion; still usually holds things in the palm of their hand (example, holds a block skilfully)
  • Uses hands to grasp, bang and splash, for example, hold bottle, bang spoon on table
  • Rotates wrist to turn objects as way of exploring
  • Puts hand on breast or bottle while drinking and may pat gently; pats and pulls at hair, glasses and face
  • Follows a moving object with their eyes
  • Transfer objects from one hand to the other while still bringing hands or toy to mouth

Emerging Skills

  • Drinks from a sippy cup with help
  • Attempts to feed self

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Gross Motor

Gross Motor Development refers to crawling, pulling oneself up to stand, cruising, and walking. These gross motor skills occurs for all infants as they first begin crawls and eventually start walking as they become toddlers.

Typical Skills

  • Rolls from back to stomach, stomach to back
  • Sit by themselves with support either leaning forward on arms or propped up against a pillow; sits well in a chair
  • Pull themselves up from lying on their back when you grasp their hands
  • Bears large amount of weight on legs and bounces when held in standing position
  • On tummy, lifts and extends legs high; may get up on hands and knees in crouch position, to move forward or backward or rock back and forth

Emerging Skills

  • Uses protective extension, i.e., arms extended out front or to the side
  • Holds weight on one hand when on stomach
  • Goes from sitting to lying on tummy
  • Creeps forward on tummy

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Intellectual

Intellectual Development means exploring cause-and-effect exploration, problem solving, imitation, spatial and memory exploration. Cause-and-effect exploration is repeating actions that produce similar outcomes. Problem solving within infancy is exploring objects with their hands, finger, toes or other body parts, and finding hidden toys, objects or people. Spatial and memory exploration is tracking moving objects and recognizing previously seen objects or faces

Typical Skills

  • Looks at and studies things for a long time; turns objects upside down to get another view of them (example, lifts cup by handles)
  • Looks for family members or pet when their name is called
  • Picks things up, shakes them, listens to sounds they make when dropped; senses the relationship between their hands and objects
  • Follows path of fast moving object with eyes

Emerging Skills

  • Enjoys peek-a-boo more as they understand things are still there when they are out of sight
  • Realizes they can move things, e.g., slides toy or object across surface
  • Demonstrates early problem solving, e.g., holds one block, reaches for a second; looks at third block trying to figure out how to grab it
  • Rotates objects to find their functional side

Activities to Support Your Child's Development

Language

Language Development refers to various forms of communication: verbal and non-verbal communication skills which an infant develops from the first month of infancy through to 24 months as they become toddlers. Verbal communication is the sounds infants typically make, such as ‘oooooh’ or ‘aaaah’. These sounds continuously develop and eventually become words. Example of non-verbal communication; eye contact with caregivers, gazing with the eyes and various forms of gestures to communicate the infant’s needs.

Typical Skills

  • Makes some vowel-consonant sounds using such consonants as f, v, th, s, sh, sz, m and n
  • Has a ‘conversation’ by babbling with family members
  • Begins to understand some words by tone of voice, intonations and a look on your face
  • Turns when they hear their name

Emerging Skills

  • Waves in response to “bye-bye”
  • Listens to own voice sounds and those of others
  • Distinguishes sounds from home language

Activities to Support Your Child's Development